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Seattle/Western Wash. News Releases for Sun. May. 29 - 8:12 am
Fri. 05/27/16
America's Credit Unions "Give Back" to Seattle
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 05/27/16 10:23 AM
SEATTLE, WA -- When thousands of delegates from credit unions gather in Seattle next month for the America's Credit Union Conference, they'll do much more than talk about interest rates and mobile banking. They'll demonstrate their "people helping people" philosophy and give back--the credit union DNA. Here are some examples:

Credit unions celebrate teachers of financial education. June 26, 2016 9:00 a.m. --11:00 a.m. Seattle Sheraton Hotel. This engaging event is free for teachers and open to media. Teachers know it's important to teach financial basics, but they don't have the curriculum. Credit unions will provide K-12 teachers with financial education resources to take back to their classrooms. This high energy, fast paced workshop is another way America's most trusted financial institutions--credit unions--are partnering with teachers.

Seattle-area credit unions commit another $1million to Seattle Children's Hospital. June 29, 2016 2:00 p.m. Level 6 Skybridge, Seattle Children's Hospital. High medical bills are a leading cause of bankruptcy. Seattle's credit unions commit to contribute $1 million over the next five years toward "uncompensated care" --the bills families can't afford and insurance won't cover. "Credit Unions for Kids" is the credit union movement's national charity of choice, and it was founded here in the Northwest. So far, credit unions have contributed over $150 million to Children's Miracle Network Hospitals.

Financial industry reporters will find a boatload of terrific stories to cover on trends, technology and the tangible benefits 105 million members are receiving, because they belong to local, not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions. Visit the ACUC website to explore all the possibilities for stories your news consumers will value. http://events.cuna.org/acuc16


The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 157 of Oregon and Washington's credit unions. Northwest credit unions returned $352 million in direct financial benefits to their 5.2 million members last year. The NWCUA is the voice of the Northwest credit union movement, providing legislative, regulatory and public advocacy in addition to education, compliance, networking support and business solutions to credit unions. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/4992/94794/Credit_Unions_Appreciate_Teachers_Event_Flyer.pdf , 2016-05/4992/94794/Americas_credit_unions_give_back_to_Seattle.docx
Celebrating Nearly 50 Years of Youth Programs All Stars
Capital Region ESD 113 - 05/27/16 9:24 AM
TUMWATER -- MAY 27, 2016 -- On June 13, Capital Region Educational Service District 113 (CR ESD 113) and Community Youth Services (CYS) will jointly celebrate nearly 50 years of youth workforce development, empowering youth between the ages of 16 and 24 to break the cycle of poverty by accomplishing their educational and vocational career goals.

Community partners and current or former participants of the CR ESD 113 Youth Programs and the CYS CareerTREK program are invited to celebrate this important work on June 13, from 3:30 to 5:30 pm at CR ESD 113 in Tumwater. Attendees will be encouraged share their experiences with the program. Light refreshments will be served.

CR ESD 113 Youth Programs staff members have worked with program-eligible youth in Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason and Pacific counties, helping them prepare for permanent unsubsidized employment through practical work experiences and work readiness workshops, and by helping them with academic performance and enrichment activities. CYS CareerTREK program staff member have provided similar services for youth in Thurston County. Funding for the programs has come from the US Department of Labor, through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

"We're proud of the work done by the Youth Programs participants, staff and community partners," said CR ESD 113 Superintendent Dr. Dana Anderson. "By working together, more young people have developed the skills and knowledge they need for success."

The Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council (PMWDC) contracts for WIOA funded services in this region. PMWDC's contract with CR ESD 113 will end July 1, and WIOA youth services will be provided by a new contractor.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
WIOA Youth Programs (http://www.esd113.org/Page/2405)
Community Youth Services CareerTREK (http://www.communityyouthservices.org/CT.shtml)
PMWDC Youth Services Committee (http://www.pacmtn.org/youth-alliance)

ABOUT CR ESD 113
The purpose of CR ESD 113 is to ensure excellent and equitable education for all students through service and collaboration. Led by Superintendent Dr. Dana Anderson, CR ESD 113 provides services for 44 school districts and approved private schools in Thurston, Mason, Lewis, Grays Harbor and Pacific counties.

STAY IN TOUCH
Website (http://www.esd113.org)
Twitter (https://twitter.com/ESD113)
Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/esd113)
Wed. 05/25/16
BPA celebrates 75th anniversary of Woody Guthrie's Columbia River songs (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/25/16 3:11 PM
In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.
In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94736/thumb_Woody-Guthrie-Day-Event-Poster.jpg
Folksinger wrote 26 songs promoting the Columbia River, benefits of new hydroelectric dams

Portland, Ore. - Seventy-five years ago, legendary folksinger and songwriter Woody Guthrie wrote 26 songs for the Bonneville Power Administration. During his month of employment in the spring of 1941, Guthrie traveled across Oregon and Washington and visited towns, farms, Native American locales and the construction site of Grand Coulee Dam in northeast Washington. Inspired by the people he met and his own observations and experiences, Guthrie wrote a collection of songs about the Columbia River and the benefits new federal hydroelectric dams would bring to the people of the Northwest.

"He plucked tunes about the people, the mighty Columbia River, the beautiful Northwest landscape, and the promise of prosperity from new hydroelectric dams," said Libby Burke, archivist in BPA's library. "The construction of the Grand Coulee and Bonneville dams brought electricity, irrigation for crops and jobs at a time when many folks were desperate for work following the Great Depression."

The songs Guthrie wrote in his employment at BPA are known collectively as "The Columbia River Songs." The titles include, "Roll On, Columbia," "Grand Coulee Dam," "Pastures of Plenty" and "The Biggest Thing that Man has Ever Done," and some later became part of Northwest and American musical tradition.

In celebration of this 75th anniversary, Washington Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed May 28 as "Woody Guthrie Day" in the state of Washington. BPA is one of the community sponsors of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event (www.woodyguthrieday.com) at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.

"We're excited to celebrate the music of this great American songwriter and his 30-day employment with us back in 1941," Burke added.

The free event includes music all day on the big lawn, film screenings, a booth highlighting the history of Guthrie's songwriting for BPA, historical presentations, and readings and signings of "26 Songs in 30 Days: Woody Guthrie's Columbia River Songs and the Planned Promised Land in the Pacific Northwest," a new book by Seattle KEXP radio host Greg Vandy that was researched at BPA's library in Portland, Ore. This will also be the opening weekend of the Grand Coulee Dam laser show, which will follow the programs.

BPA is also hosting an anniversary celebration of the Columbia River songs on Woody Guthrie's 104th birthday, July 14, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at its headquarters in Portland. The event, which is open to the public, will feature a presentation about Guthrie's songwriting for BPA, screening of film clips, an interview with author Greg Vandy and BPA researcher Libby Burke, as well as a book signing by Vandy. Half of the sales of his "26 Songs in 30 Days" book will benefit the Northwest Federal Employees Association's scholarship fund.

Woody Guthrie was hired to write music for a BPA-produced movie about Columbia River power. The film called, "The Columbia," was abandoned before completion due to the start of World War II. It was finally finished in 1949, after footage of the Vanport flood offered the writer and producer, BPA's Stephen B. Kahn, an opportunity to include flood control in the film as a case for continued federal dam building. However, all the film prints that were known -- along with the 1939 film, "Hydro," and many public power promotional pamphlets and materials -- were destroyed in 1953 and for the most part forgotten.

Four decades later, employee Bill Murlin, who worked in BPA's public affairs office, discovered Guthrie's name in the film credits while looking for material for BPA's 50th anniversary. Over the next several years, Murlin researched Guthrie's wildly productive month of songwriting, ultimately leading to BPA's release of a songbook and the recordings.

BPA recently released two collections of films that include "The Columbia" and the 1987 film "River of Power," which features some of Guthrie's original demo recordings tracked down by Murlin. To view or learn more about BPA's films, visit: www.bpa.gov/goto/films. Free DVD copies may be ordered from the BPA Library and Visitor Center.

For a gallery of Guthrie images, go to: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAr8NYu. To watch a video that showcases his music from the 1949 film "The Columbia," go to: https://youtu.be/H3muvp154_k.


Attached Media Files: In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28. , The 26 songs Woody Guthrie wrote for BPA in 1941 are known today as "The Columbia River Songs."
Precautions Urged to Help Save Bats (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/25/16 1:34 PM
Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5514/94734/thumb_25885296590_b14b9b1428_o.jpg
Portland, Ore. - This Memorial Day weekend, visitors using public lands are encouraged to help fight the spread of white-nose syndrome and save bats in the Pacific Northwest.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease that has devastated bat populations in eastern North America, killing an estimated six million bats since 2006. In March 2016, Washington's first case of WNS was confirmed 30 miles east of Seattle.

WNS is primarily spread by bat-to-bat contact. Pets, other animals, and humans and their equipment - including clothing, footwear, and gear - can transfer spores of the fungus to new locations. The disease is not known to pose a threat to humans, pets, or other animal species.

To avoid the spread of WNS, federal land management and state wildlife agencies ask that visitors to bat-friendly locations - such as caves, rock cliffs, buildings, talus areas, talus caverns, mines, or human-made structures - follow these important recommendations:

- Whenever possible, avoid disturbing bats and entering areas where bats may be living. This includes abandoned mines, caves, and abandoned buildings and structures.

- Do not handle bats, as they have reduced energy and fat stores in the spring following a lengthy hibernation. Some bats can carry the rabies virus, a deadly disease carried by less than 1% of Pacific Northwest bats.

- Report sick, injured, and dead bats, or groups of bats. In Washington, report such findings to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at www.wdfw.wa.gov/bats. In Oregon, report to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/health_program/WNS/reporting.asp or call the ODFW toll free line at 866-968-2600.

- Prohibit dogs from accessing areas where bats may be roosting.

People who come into contact with areas where bats live should follow these steps to keep from spreading the WNS fungus:

- Clean shoes and clothing of any dirt or mud before entering and after exiting a cave or climbing area, and change into clean clothing and shoes before entering a vehicle to leave.

- Wear different footwear at each visit to a cave or climbing area, unless completely cleaned after each visit.

- Wash hands and exposed skin after each visit to a cave or climbing area.

- Wash clothing, hats, gear, and shoes worn in caves in hot, soapy water at 131ºF (55ºC) or hotter for at least 20 minutes. Clean equipment that cannot be washed with alcohol wipes if the wipes will not damage the equipment.

Wildlife agencies including the WDFW, ODFW, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - along with land management partners the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and U. S. Geological Survey - are cooperating in the response efforts with many other state, local, and private organizations.

Bats play an important role in a healthy environment and economy, eating tons of crop and forest pests and saving farmers billions of dollars each year.

Additional resources and information may be found at www.whitenosesyndrome.org.

- END-


Attached Media Files: News Release , Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
Fireworks and Exploding Targets Ban
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/25/16 11:27 AM
Portland, Ore. -- As we approach Memorial Day, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service want to remind everyone that the use of fireworks and exploding targets is prohibited on all BLM-managed public lands and U.S. National Forests throughout Oregon and Washington.

So far this year we've already seen 288 fires that have burned over 1,500 acres. In recent years we've had longer fire seasons and fires are burning hotter and longer fueling the costs of fire suppression.

Those who ignite fireworks or exploding targets on BLM-managed lands can be fined up to $1,000, receive a prison term of up to one year, or both. In addition, individuals responsible for starting wildland fires on federal lands can be billed for the cost of fire suppression.
The BLM and the U.S. Forest Service cooperates with the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group to fight wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest. The Geographic Area Coordination Center offers updates on the fire potential regionally and nationally and the NW Coordination Center provides updates in the Pacific Northwest.

To keep up on the latest fire news in the Pacific Northwest be sure to tune in to the weekly Wildland Fire Minute: http://blm.gov/ksmd


Attached Media Files: 2016 Fire Prevention Order , Fireworks Exploding Targets Ban
Tue. 05/24/16
Dr. Frank Y. Ashby Selected as Deputy Superintendent for the Puget Sound Educational Service District (Photo)
Puget Sound ESD - 05/24/16 1:37 PM
2016-05/4161/94697/fya_1.jpg
2016-05/4161/94697/fya_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/4161/94697/thumb_fya_1.jpg
Dr. Frank Y. Ashby has been selected as the Deputy Superintendent -- Strategy, Planning, Business and Operations for the Puget Sound Educational Service District (PSESD). In his new position, Dr. Ashby will provide leadership in four key areas: financial services, business process improvement, strategic design and planning, and operations. His start date is July 11.

Dr. Ashby has been with the Seattle Colleges (formerly the Seattle Community Colleges) for the past eight years. Since February of 2012, he has served as the Vice President of Administrative Services at South Seattle College where he provides leadership over the operational aspects of the organization including business functions, facilities and capital projects, information technology services, campus safety and security, and environmental health and safety. He has also served as the interim Executive Director for District Financial Services and as the Director of Research and Planning in the District Chancellor's Office.

"We are thrilled to welcome Frank to the agency. He brings unique and extensive experience, coupled with a collaborative leadership style, to his new role," said PSESD Superintendent John P. Welch. "His experience and knowledge will be invaluable as the agency completes a new strategic plan in the summer and begins implementation of the plan in the fall."

Prior to joining the Seattle Colleges, Dr. Ashby worked for over 15 years in the College of Engineering at the University of Washington as a program director and coordinator. His final position was as the Director of Introductory Academic Courses with a lecturer appointment in the Department of Mechanical Engineering where he taught Introduction to Engineering Design. After a brief engineering career, Dr. Ashby's first role in education was providing direct service with a focus on diversity to Seattle Public School K-12 students through MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Achievement) at the University of Washington.

"I am excited to join PSESD. I was drawn to the agency's focus on the END: Success for Each Child and Eliminate the Opportunity Gap and the commitment to ground this work in racial equity," commented Dr. Ashby.

Dr. Ashby holds a bachelor's of science degree in chemical engineering; a master's degree in public administration; and a doctorate degree in educational leadership, all from the University of Washington.

### ###

About the Puget Sound Educational Service District
Puget Sound Educational Service District is a regional educational service agency that serves 35 school districts and more than 200 private schools in King and Pierce counties and Bainbridge Island in Washington. We serve more than 400,000 students, approximately 39% of the state's K-12 public school students. In addition, we serve 4,400 children and families through our early childhood education programs. Complete information can be found on our website: www.psesd.org


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/4161/94697/fya_1.jpg
Fri. 05/20/16
Agencies Release Study of 'West-Wide' Energy Corridors
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/20/16 11:48 AM
WASHINGTON -- The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) today released a study that provides a foundation for upcoming regional reviews of energy corridors on western public lands to assess the need for revisions and provide greater public input regarding areas that may be well suited for transmission siting. The regional reviews will begin with priority corridors in southern California, southern Nevada and western Arizona, and provide more opportunities for collaboration with the public and Federal, Tribal, state and local governmental stakeholders.

The study examines whether the energy corridors established under Section 368(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 are achieving their purpose to promote environmentally responsible corridor-siting decisions and to reduce the proliferation of dispersed rights-of-way crossing Federal lands. With the aim of encouraging more efficient and effective use of the corridors, the study establishes baseline data and presents opportunities and challenges for further consideration during the periodic regional reviews that BLM and USFS will conduct.

The corridors address a national concern by fostering long-term, systematic planning for energy transport development in the West; providing industry with a coordinated and consistent interagency permitting process; and establishing practicable measures to avoid or minimize environmental harm from future development within the corridors. Section 368(a) directed several federal agencies to designate corridors on federal lands in the 11 contiguous western states to provide linear pathways for siting oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and high voltage transmission and distribution facilities. The contiguous states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

The BLM, USFS, and DOE, among others, undertook an unprecedented landscape scale effort, including a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, starting in 2006 and completed in 2009, that designated nearly 6,000 miles of corridors, issuing two Records of Decisions and associated land use plan amendments

As required by a 2012 Settlement Agreement that resolved litigation about the corridors identified, the BLM, USFS and DOE established an interagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to explain how the agencies will review the Section 368 (a) corridors on a regional basis. The MOU, signed in June 2013, describes the interagency process for conducting the reviews, the types of information and data to be considered, and the process for incorporating resulting recommendations in BLM and USFS land use plans.

The full-text of the corridor study is available online at:
http://corridoreis.anl.gov

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: Agencies Release Study of ‘West-Wide’ Energy Corridors
Thu. 05/19/16
Newport High School Touchdown Club is hosting a Shoe drive to raise money for team expenses.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/19/16 1:20 PM
Bellevue, WA -- Newport High School Touchdown Club partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects shoes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for 2016 team expenses.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: Newport High School, located at 4333 Factoria Blvd SE. They will be collecting donations May 25th from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Cindy Spencer at 425-922-2493 Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.

###
MEDIA ALERT/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY: Hundreds to support people with diabetes by participating in Tour de Cure this Sunday
American Diabetes Association - 05/19/16 8:50 AM
WHAT: Nearly 700 people, many with diabetes, will ride and walk in the 25th Annual Tour de Cure event, presented by QFC and Northwest Kidney Centers. Their goal is to raise more than $700,000 for the American Diabetes Association. The event includes five cycling routes (100 mile, 70 mile, 40 mile, 25 mile and 10 mile), and 5 mile and 3 mile walking routes. Additional sponsorship support is provided by Nintendo, Swedish, Chateau Ste. Michelle and Mini at Bellevue Square.

WHEN: Sunday, May 22. The 100-mile ride begins at 6:30 a.m., with starts throughout the morning for the other routes. The best time for photos/video is 1 to 2 p.m. when most participants return for finish line festivities and the Wellness Village.

WHERE: Tour de Cure will begin and end at Chateau Ste. Michelle, 14111 NE 145th Street in Woodinville.

WHY: Every year, an estimated 450,000 people in Washington are diagnosed with diabetes. Plus, nearly 1.9 million adults in Washington are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and most don't even know it. Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to horrific complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke and amputation. Diabetes kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast cancer combined. Funds raised through Tour de Cure support diabetes research and prevention initiatives, and programs to help people living with diabetes.
Mon. 05/16/16
BLM Gathering Public Input on Coal Program at Six Public Meetings Public Participation is Next Step in Comprehensive Coal Program Review
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/16/16 3:02 PM
Washington, D.C.--As the next step in the Department of the Interior's comprehensive review of the federal coal program, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will solicit public input at six public meetings starting with Casper, Wyo., on May 17.

Meetings in Casper, Wyo., Salt Lake City, Knoxville, Seattle, and Grand Junction, Colo., will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. local time. The Pittsburgh meeting will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. local time. Specifics for all of the upcoming public scoping meetings can be found below:

May 17, 2016 Casper Events Center
1 Events Drive
Casper, WY 82601
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:30 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May 19, 2016 Salt Palace Convention Center
90 South West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m., meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May 26, 2016 Tennessee Theatre
604 S. Gay Street
Knoxville, TN 37902
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 21, 2016 Sheraton Seattle Downtown
1400 6th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 23, 2016 Two Rivers Convention Center Avalon Theatre
645 Main Street
Grand Junction, CO 81501
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 28, 2016 Pittsburgh Convention Center
1000 Fort Duquesne Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Doors open for speaker registration at 11:00 a.m.; meeting 1 to 7 p.m.
Please note this is a new date; the meeting originally scheduled for June 16, 2016, is now scheduled for June 28, 2016.

The meetings in Casper, Wyo., Seattle and Pittsburgh will be live-streamed at www.blm.gov/live,and; meetings in Salt Lake City, Knoxville, Tenn., and Grand Junction, Colo., will have a toll-free, listen-only audio link available via telephone.

Those who attend the meetings in person and who wish to speak will be asked to sign in. Speakers will be called upon on a first-come, first-served basis determined by sign-in order. Attendees wishing to speak will be accommodated to the fullest extent possible given the time available. The maximum speaking time per speaker is three minutes.

Written comments may be submitted until July 28, 2016, using one of the following methods:

Email: BLM_WO_Coal_Program_PEIS_Comments@blm.gov

Mail: Coal Programmatic EIS Scoping
Bureau of Land Management
20 M St. SE, Room 2134 LM
Washington, D.C. 20003

Please note that the deadline for submitting written comments was changed to July 28, 2016, due to the rescheduling of the Pittsburgh public scoping meeting.

Additional information on the PEIS can be found here, and additional information on the federal coal program can be found here. The Notice of Intent to prepare a Programmatic EIS can be found here.

-BLM-


Attached Media Files: BLM Gathering Public Input on Coal Program at Six Public Meetings
Seattle woman gives back to the American Diabetes Association after a double organ transplant.
American Diabetes Association - 05/16/16 9:57 AM
Leah Regan will join hundreds of Northwest participants for the American Diabetes Association's Tour de Cure, Sunday, May 22.

Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 4, one of Leah Regan's earliest memories is of her doctor telling her to take care of herself, because you never know what medical advancements might be available in the future.

"I thought he was just getting me to test my blood sugar," Leah remembers. "I knew doctors and researchers were working to improve the lives of people with diabetes. But never did I imagine something would come along in my lifetime to benefit me. Never."

Leah, now 37, lives in Seattle with her husband of 11 years and their 2 ?1/2 year old daughter. She works at Starbucks as the Manager of Operations Consultation for Roastery & Reserve stores. Just a few years ago, complications from her diabetes led to kidney failure and an uncertain future.

In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, a hormone needed to get glucose from the bloodstream to the body. When enough beta cells are destroyed, the pancreas stops producing insulin, or makes too little, causing high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar also causes the kidneys overwork. In time, kidneys begin to lose their filtering ability and waste products start to build up in the blood.

Shortly after starting dialysis, Leah's doctor told her she might be candidate for a double transplant--kidney and pancreas. If successful, Leah would no longer have diabetes.
"After months of tests determined my body could handle the impact of a double transplant, I finally allowed myself to consider the possibility," Leah said.

At 8 a.m., October 12, 2015, Leah got the call from the University of Washington transplant coordinator--there was a donor match. Two days later, she woke up with a working kidney and pancreas.

"The entire process was tough, of course, but nothing can compare to how amazing I feel today," Leah said.

Leah's recovery has been nothing short of amazing. She credits her doctors and the work of the American Diabetes Association for saving her life.

"I'm giving back to the American Diabetes Association today because none of this would have been possible without the research and programs they fund. The double transplant I received has only been in practice for 10 years, and only 1,000 are completed in the United States each year. I owe my life and so much more to the efforts of people who strive to make these advancements a reality," said Leah.

Leah, her family and a team from Starbucks will join nearly 700 other participants in the 25th annual Tour de Cure, Sunday, May 22 at Chateau Ste. Michelle. The event includes five cycling routes and two walk routes, and will raise more than $700,000 for the American Diabetes Association and programs to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by the disease. More information on Tour de Cure is available at diabetes.org/seattletourdecure.
State Welcomes New Statewide Licensing Administrator (Photo)
Wash. State Dept. of Early Learning - 05/16/16 8:53 AM
Travis Hansen, Statewide Licensing Administrator
Travis Hansen, Statewide Licensing Administrator
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5169/94463/thumb_Travis_Hans.png
The Washington State Department of Early Learning (DEL) is pleased to announce that Travis Hansen has accepted the Early Learning Statewide Licensing Administrator position. Hansen is currently the Regional Administrator for DEL's North Central region, which includes counties from Okanogan in the north to southern Klickitat.

Travis comes to this position with a wealth of experience and dedication to early learning. He has devoted his passion and energy to Washington State social and early learning services for over 10 years. Travis's professional history and his vision for licensing services as a foundation to a quality early learning system will be a great asset to the DEL administration team.

"I believe quality child care starts with a healthy and safe child," said Hansen. "It is a true honor to be able to work in such a great early learning system in Washington State."

For the last four years Travis has successfully lead licensing services in 13 counties of the North Central region, supporting children, families, early learning providers, and communities from the Canada to Oregon boarders.

Prior to that, Hansen was DEL's Licensing Supervisor for the Yakima Office, Travis also worked as a program manager, therapist, and a supervisor for various agencies, including the Department of Social and Health Services, Crest Counseling Services and EPIC Youth Services.

"Travis brings many skills and talents that are transferrable and highly desirable to this new role," said Luba Bezborodnikova, DEL Assistant Director.

Travis earned his Master's degree in Social Work with a specialization in Counseling as well as Public Administration from Eastern Washington University. Hansen and his wife have five children of their own, Riley, Cooper, Chase, Brady, and Hunter--all boys.

Photo Caption: Travis Hansen, Statewide Licensing Administrator.


Attached Media Files: Word doc with hyperlinks , Travis Hansen, Statewide Licensing Administrator
Fri. 05/13/16
Federal partners unveil safer, more efficient turbine at Ice Harbor Dam (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/13/16 12:24 PM
This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94431/thumb_New-Turbine-Ice-Harbor-Dam.JPG
BURBANK, Wash. -- An advanced-technology turbine, designed to improve fish passage at federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers is being installed at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.

The $58 million project, funded by BPA, calls for runner replacements on two turbines, one fixed-blade, one adjustable, along with fish passageway improvements at Ice Harbor over the next few years.

The first turbine is set to be operational within 12 to 14 months. The work includes structural modifications to the turbine draft tube exits to improve hydraulic conditions for fish. The contracts also contain options to fabricate and install a third turbine runner.

The turbine design and installation is a collaboration between contractor, Voith Hydro Inc. of York, Pa., the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bonneville Power Administration and NOAA Fisheries. Small-scale model testing of the new fixed-blade runner design indicates it may also increase power generation by 3 to 4 percent.

"After 50 years of operation and increasing maintenance requirements, the need to replace the existing turbine runners at Ice Harbor presented the opportunity to pursue new turbine runner designs with fish passage improvement as a priority," said Kevin Crum, project manager.

Voith Hydro Inc. used digital and physical models, and multiple design cycles to settle on two styles of high-tech runners, (turbine runners are the parts that rotate in water to generate power). The turbine runners are made of stainless steel to fight water corrosion.

BPA engineer George Brown called the work an "excellent example of collaboration among BPA, the Corps, NOAA and a capable contractor."

"The key ingredient holding us all together is the goal of creating meaningful improvements to the environmental performance of a critical Northwest power resource," Brown says. "The efficiency and reliability benefits to the hydroelectric system are an important bonus, stretching the value of the limited water resource."

Advanced-technology turbines could eventually extend beyond Ice Harbor to replace aging infrastructure at other Columbia and Snake river dams.

The latest monitoring shows that less than 10 percent of all migrating juvenile salmon and steelhead pass through turbines on the Snake river, depending on the dam and the species of fish. At Ice Harbor Dam that number is between 0.5 to 8.6 percent. Most out-migrating fish use surface passage, such as spillway weirs, on their way to the ocean. About 93 to 96 percent of all young salmon and steelhead now survive passage at each dam in the Federal Columbia River Power System.

For more information about the Ice Harbor turbine runner design and other programs to benefit Columbia River salmon and steelhead, visit: www.nww.usace.army.mil/Missions/FishPrograms.aspx and www.salmonrecovery.gov.


Attached Media Files: This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
Wild Horses and Burros on Public Rangelands Now 2.5 Times Greater than 1971 when Protection Law Was Passed (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/13/16 10:56 AM
Wild Horses
Wild Horses
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5514/94428/thumb_23042755566_6b84b50403_k.jpg
BLM seeks to expand initiatives to address problems with new legislative authority

46,000 Horses Already Being Cared for Off-Range
Off-Range Care of Unadopted Horses Would Exceed $1 Billion
Necessary Horse Gathers Exceed Available Space and Funding

The Bureau of Land Management announced today that as of March 1, 2016, more than 67,000 wild horses and burros are roaming Western public rangelands -- a 15 percent increase over the estimated 2015 population.

The updated numbers show more than twice the number of horses on the range than is recommended under BLM land use plans. It is also two and a half times the number of horses and burros that were estimated to be in existence when the Wild and Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act was passed in 1971. To help address the problem, BLM is seeking legislative authority for additional initiatives.

"Over the past seven years we have doubled the amount of funding used for managing our nation's wild horses and burros," said BLM Director Neil Kornze. "Despite this, major shifts in the adoption market and the absence of a long-term fertility control drug have driven population levels higher. A number of program reforms are underway, but assistance is needed from our local, state, and federal partners."

While herds of wild horses consistently double in size every four years, there has also been a dramatic decrease in adoptions in recent years. In the early 2000s, nearly 8,000 horses were being placed with private adopters each year. Due to a number of economic factors, that number is now down to roughly 2,500 animals each year, compounding an already difficult management situation.

The total lifetime cost of caring for an unadopted animal that is removed from the range is substantial. Costs for lifetime care in a corral approaches $50,000 per horse. With 46,000 horses and burros already in off-range corrals and pastures, this means that without new opportunities for placing these animals with responsible owners, the BLM will spend more than a billion dollars to care for and feed these animals over the remainder of their lives. Given this vast financial commitment, the BLM is now severely limited in how many animals it can afford to remove from the range.

To address these issues the BLM is taking a number of steps, including sponsoring a significant research program focused on fertility control; transitioning horses from off-range corrals to more cost-effective pastures; working to increase adoptions with new programs and partnerships; and requesting two new pieces of legislative authority -- one to allow for the immediate transfer of horses to other agencies that have a need for work animals and one that would create a congressionally-chartered foundation that could help fund and support adoption efforts. Additional tools and resources are needed to bring this program onto a sustainable path.

The table below shows the 2016 West-wide, on-range population on a state-by-state basis as of March 1, 2016. This year's 15 percent increase over the 2015 population compares to an 18 percent increase from 2014 to 2015. The BLM plans to remove 3,500 wild horses and burros from Western public rangelands in 2016.

Wild Horse and Burro On-Range Population as of March 1, 2016
State Horses Burros Total Maximum AML
AZ 318 5,317 5,635 1,676
CA 4,925 3,391 8,316 2,200
CO 1,530 0 1,530 812
ID 468 0 468 617
MT 160 0 160 120
NV 31,979 2,552 34,531 12,811
NM 171 0 171 83
OR 3,785 56 3,841 2,715
UT 5,440 400 5,840 1,956
WY 6,535 0 6,535 3,725
TOTAL 55,311 11,716 67,027 26,715

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: BLM Wild Horse and Burro Population , Wild Horses
Thu. 05/12/16
PeaceHealth nurse goes extra mile to care for patient's dog (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 05/12/16 12:56 PM
2016-05/5173/94390/FufuTheDog.jpg
2016-05/5173/94390/FufuTheDog.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5173/94390/thumb_FufuTheDog.jpg
Crystal Espinoza, RN, knows more than a thing or two about nursing. She's worked as a registered nurse, managing care for patients in PeaceHealth United General Medical Center for eight years. There's not too much that she hasn't done or seen in the care of those who need her most. But Crystal's care for her patient Arlene Zinkle-Payne is extraordinary.

Arlene is a patient at PeaceHealth United General Medical Center in Sedro-Woolley, WA. She is also the sole care provider for her beloved dog Fufu. While in the hospital, Arlene had no way to care for Fufu, so animal control officers had to take Fufu to an animal shelter in Everett, Washington. Recognizing the importance of the pet to Zinkle-Payne's well-being and recovery, Crystal arranged to have Fufu picked up at the animal shelter and brought back to Sedro-Woolley, where she is caring for Fufu in her own home. Arlene is overjoyed to know that Fufu is being loved and well-treated while she recovers.

"I see heroes and angels every day in nursing," says Preet Singh, RN, director of clinical services at PeaceHealth United General. "I am so proud of the care, love and trust that our patients and families receive every day--not just from Crystal, but from each and every one of the nurses who work at PeaceHealth," continued Singh.

National Nurses Week is May 6-May 13.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/5173/94390/FufuTheDog.jpg
Washington Makes Gains in Pre-K Funding and Enrollment
Wash. State Dept. of Early Learning - 05/12/16 12:09 PM
Olympia, WA and New York, NY--Many 3- and 4-year olds across the nation still lack access to high-quality preschool education despite modest gains in enrollment, quality, and funding, according to an annual report by the nonpartisan National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University.

In Washington, the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) enrolled 10,091 children, up 1350 in 2014-2015, serving eight percent of the state's 4-year-olds. Washington maintained consistent progress in terms of quality standards-- meeting nine of NIEER's minimum quality standards benchmarks. As of 2014-2015, ECEAP was required to participate in the state's quality rating and improvement system, called Early Achievers. In 2014-2105, the state invested a total of $83 million in ECEAP, with approximately $76 million of these funds coming from state dollars from the state general fund and the "opportunity pathways account," which is derived from lottery revenue.

"NIEER's findings support our need for more high-quality programs and importantly, the inclusion of full-day models into our early learning settings," said Department of Early Learning Director, Ross Hunter. "As we near our state's milestone of making preschool an entitlement for low-income families, we need to ensure expansion of programs that prove success in child outcomes."

More about ECEAP:
60% of ECEAP children are ready the spring before entering Kindergarten.
There are 11,955 children eligible for ECEAP who are not served by ECEAP or Head Start. According to the February 2016 Caseload Forecast Council, 6,260 of these would likely participate if space were available.
By fall 2020's entitlement milestone, Washington will need 7,377 more slots for children than Washington currently has, based on the children likely to participate.
o This requires adding 1,844 more slots each year for the next four years, beginning with the 2017-18 school year.
To add the 7,377 by fall 2020, Washington will need 266 more classrooms, 266 more trained lead teachers, and 266 more assistant teachers.

The Legislature has made preschool a statutory entitlement for families with incomes at or below 110% of federal poverty level, or FPL, by fall 2020.

The State of Preschool report for the 2014-2015 school year, which includes objective state-by-state profiles and rankings, indicates that urgent action is needed from lawmakers at all levels of government to ensure that every child -- particularly those from low-income families -- have access to high-quality early education. For the first year, NIEER also analyzed states' early education workforce and Dual Language Learner policies, which reveal that Washington is one of 14 states that can report the home language of every pre-K student.

However, Washington does not require pre-K teachers to have a Bachelor's degree, nor does it provide salary parity between pre-K and K-3 teachers.

The report finds that total state spending on pre-K programs for the nation as a whole increased by 10 percent, or $553 million, since the previous year, bringing state spending in 2014-2015 to over $6.2 billion. The number of children served by state-funded pre-K served increased by 37,167 in 2014-2015, bringing the total to almost 1.4 million children -- the largest number of children ever served by state-funded pre-K. With an average rate of $4,489, states also made one of the most significant increases in spending per child in recent history.

For more information on The State of Preschool 2015 yearbook and detailed state-by-state breakdowns on quality benchmarks, enrollment, and funding, please click here.


Attached Media Files: Word document with hyperlinks
Crownhill Elementary hosting a clothing drive to raise money to improve their outdoor play equipment.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/12/16 8:00 AM
Bremerton, WA-- Crownhill Elementary partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for planning improvements to their outdoor equipment to enhance and improve recess time for the children!!

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: Crownhill Elementary 1500 Rock Pt Rd Bremerton, WA 98312. They will be collecting donations between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on May 24-27, 2016.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Becci Eismann at [insert (509) 714-3778, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
St. Francis of Assisi School hosting a clothing drive to raise money for their mission project.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/12/16 7:00 AM
Burien, WA -- St. Francis of Assisi School partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for their sister school in Kenya.

This special collection will help the well that the children of St. Francis of Assisi has funded, provide scholarships for girls who could not otherwise attend high school and support our sister school relationship in Ndavaya, Mombasa in Kenya.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: St. Francis of Assisi School, located at 15216 21st Ave SW. They will be collecting donations between 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on May 22nd -- May 26th.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Cindy Spencer at 425-922-2493, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Wed. 05/11/16
PeaceHealth selects proven health care CFO with passion for community benefit (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 05/11/16 10:26 AM
Kim Hodgkinson
Kim Hodgkinson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5173/94349/thumb_Kim_Hodgkinson.jpg
VANCOUVER, Wash. -- PeaceHealth announced today that Ms. Kimberly Hodgkinson will join the health system as executive vice president and chief financial officer. An advocate of community health improvement programs and longtime proponent of community benefit programs, Hodgkinson has helped launch initiatives that have improved access to high quality care in the communities where she serves.

"We are truly excited about having Kim serve our health care ministry and our communities," said Liz Dunne, PeaceHealth president and chief executive officer. "She is a strong cultural fit for our organization, with a proven background as a Catholic health care financial executive leader."

Hodgkinson is joining PeaceHealth from St. Vincent's HealthCare in Jacksonville, Fla., an Ascension Health ministry, where she serves as chief financial officer. She brings extensive experience leading finance for both large and small health care ministries. Previously, Hodgkinson served as senior vice president and CFO for St. Mary's Health in Evansville, Ind., as vice president of finance for Agnesian Health Care in Fond du Lac, Wis., and in senior finance leadership roles at Trinity Health, Aurora Health Care, and Columbia St. Mary's Health System.

"In addition to her impressive financial background, Kim has led multiple strategic and operational initiatives at Ascension and throughout her health care career," Dunne said.

These initiatives include financial services improvements, electronic health record implementation, supply chain new products decision team, revenue cycle standardization, value-based managed care negotiations, partnership development, and most recently an innovative pilot for predictive pricing for patients.

"Kim's experience in the health improvement movement will be instrumental and beneficial to our long-term strategies of partnering with our communities to make them the healthiest in the Pacific Northwest," Dunne said.

Hodgkinson holds joint master's degrees from Western Michigan University: an MBA in finance and an MA in nuclear physics.

"I am delighted by the opportunity to join PeaceHealth," Hodgkinson said. "I admire the organization's deeply held commitment to Mission and to community benefit. I have to say that community benefit programs hold a special place in my heart, and it's exciting to see PeaceHealth's rigorous focus on engaging our communities, patients, providers and caregivers through our Mission work."

Hodgkinson and her husband, Tom Branch, will be relocating from Florida in the coming weeks. Her first day at PeaceHealth will be June 13.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon, and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with about 900 providers, a laboratory system, and 10 medical centers. PeaceHealth was founded in 1890 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace to fill a need for health care services in the Pacific Northwest. The Sisters shared financial and personnel resources to open new hospitals. They shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for health care in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of collaboration and stewardship in fulfilling its mission. This is The Spirit of Health.

Photo: Kim Hodgkinson

###


Attached Media Files: Kim Hodgkinson
Tue. 05/10/16
PeaceHealth Board Appoints Proven Senior Health Care Leaders (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 05/10/16 4:03 PM
Kevin Murphy
Kevin Murphy
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5173/94335/thumb_Kevin_Murphy.jpg
VANCOUVER, Wash. -- May 9, 2016 -- PeaceHealth, a not-for-profit, faith-based health system based in Vancouver, Wash, announced today the appointment of three new members to the system board of directors. Effective immediately Todd Alan Strumwasser, M.D.; Karl Carrier; and Kevin Murphy, Ph.D.; will be joining the PeaceHealth board of directors. Each of the new members brings talent and skill that will help the board and President & Chief Executive Officer Liz Dunne shepherd in a new era of health care transformation within the communities of the 125-year-old health system serves.

"We are so blessed to have Dr. Strumwasser, Mr. Carrier and Dr. Murphy join our ministry," said board chair Sister Andrea Nenzel, CSJP. "The addition of each of these talented and skilled mission sponsors will add to the collective gifts of all of our board as we continue our mission of promoting personal and community health."

Each of the newest members of the PeaceHealth system board has a proven track record in health care operations, strategy and financial stewardship. Additionally, Strumwasser, Carrier and Murphy share a deeply held commitment to the PeaceHealth mission, vision and values.

Todd Strumwasser, M.D., currently serves as senior vice president, operations for San Francisco Bay Service Area of Dignity Health. He was formally the chief executive of Swedish First Hill and Cherry Hill campuses, which accounted for 80 percent of the admissions and revenue for the Swedish Health Services system. He is a graduate of University of Southern California-Keck School of Medicine. Strumwasser is a health care leader with personal and professional passion for advancing health and health improvement in each of the communities served by PeaceHealth.

Karl Carrier was interim senior vice president and chief executive of Providence Health & Services California, based in Torrance. He had a successful career in non-profit health care having held various senior executive leadership roles with Providence Health & Services as well as chief financial officer for Riverside Community Hospital and Summit Health. Carrier holds a master's degree in Business Administration, Finance from University of Oregon. His highly successful career as a nonprofit finance leader has helped position his current and past organizations for future strategic growth and service to their communities.

Kevin Murphy, Ph.D., is a leader throughout the health care ethics community. He currently serves as vice president of Theology and Ethics for St. Joseph Health in Irvine, Calif. He has a rich professional career in health care and academic communities serving as a senior ethics and mission integration leader. Previously he has served at the University of British Columbia, Providence Health Care, as well as the University of Alberta, Canada. He currently serves on the board of directors of the Supportive Care Coalition, previously on the Foundation Board of the Bioethics Institute at Loyola Marymount University, and the Ministry Leadership Center. Murphy holds a Ph.D. in Theology, Health Care Ethics from St. Paul University.

"We are truly fortunate that each of these remarkable gentlemen has agreed to join our ministry as a board member," said Liz Dunne, president & CEO of PeaceHealth. "We are steadfast in our commitment to health and health improvement of everyone we serve. Dr. Strumwasser, Mr. Carrier and Dr. Murphy will undoubtedly compliment the talents and professional experience all of our board members bring to our organization. I am truly grateful and inspired by each of them."

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon, and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with about 900 providers, a laboratory system, and 10 medical centers. PeaceHealth was founded in 1890 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace to fill a need for health care services in the Pacific Northwest. The Sisters shared financial and personnel resources to open new hospitals. They shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for health care in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of collaboration and stewardship in fulfilling its mission. This is The Spirit of Health.

Photos: Todd Strumwasser, Kevin Murphy, Karl Carrier
###


Attached Media Files: Kevin Murphy , Karl Carrier , Todd Strumwasser, M.D.
Friends of Hoop hosting a clothing drive to raise money for team travel expenses
Clothes for the Cause - 05/10/16 10:00 AM
Bellevue, WA -- Friends of Hoop partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for their select basketball teams to travel to tournaments.

Friends of Hoop prides themselves on providing a positive place for players to grow as individuals within the team environment. Their goals are to form those teams to be great representatives of themselves, their families, their schools, teammates, and the program both on and off the court.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: Bellevue Community College, located at 3000 Landerholm Circle SE. They will be collecting donations between 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on May 18th.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Cindy Spencer at 425-922-2493, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Dimmitt Middle School hosting a clothing drive to raise money for PTSA general fund.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/10/16 8:00 AM
Seattle, WA -- Dimmitt Middle School PTSA partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for their PTSA.

PTSA funds activities that enhance learning experiences that the school would not otherwise be able to provide.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: Dimmitt Middle School, located at 12320 80th Ave S. They will be collecting donations between 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on May 17th.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Cindy Spencer at 425-922-2493, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Mon. 05/09/16
Media Advisory: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Installs New Snake River Turbine
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/09/16 4:06 PM
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Installs New Snake River Turbine
Safer for Fish -- More Efficient Power Generation


Burbank, Wash. -- A new high-tech turbine, that is safer for salmon and steelhead, will be installed at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam on Washington's lower Snake River.

Over the next year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will install the new turbine, with plans to replace a second turbine in 2018.

Paid for by the Bonneville Power Administration and built in collaboration with the Corps, BPA, NOAA-Fisheries and Voith Hydro Inc. of York, Pa., the turbine is designed for safer fish passage and more-efficient power operations.

To showcase the new turbine and its improvements, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will open Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in Burbank, Wash. to the media on Friday, May 13. The USACE-Walla Walla District Commander and VP of Power Services at the Bonneville Power Administration will provide detailed information about the turbine at the event.

WHAT: Media availability with photo opportunity of new state-of-the-art turbine

WHO: Lt. Col. Timothy Vail, Commander, USACE-Walla Walla District
Mark Gendron, BPA Senior VP Power Services
Bob Gallo, President and CEO, Voith Hydro Inc.
Design team members from federal agencies and Voith Hydro Inc.

WHEN: Friday, May 13, 2016, 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.

WHERE: Ice Harbor Lock and Dam, 2339 Monument Drive, Burbank, WA 99323

RSVP: Please, RSVP not later than noon on Thursday, May 12, 2016
USACE-Walla Walla District, Public Affairs
509-527-7018 or cenww-pa@usace.army.mil

Notes: Please, arrive no later than 9:45 a.m. for a safety/photo-security briefing. The event will be conducted inside secure areas of Ice Harbor's facilities -- Attendees must be U.S. citizens and have U.S.-issued photo identification available upon arrival at the dam. Non-U.S. citizens and those without identification will not be allowed to enter the secure areas without exception. Participants are required to wear closed-toe, sturdy, but comfortable, walking shoes (no high heels, sandals, etc. are allowed for safety reasons).
Fri. 05/06/16
The Pacific Northwest Collects 16 Tons At The Latest DEA National Drug Take-Back Day
DEA Seattle - 05/06/16 12:52 PM
Residents of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) responded overwhelmingly to the most recent DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. On April 30, 2016, in a four hour period, residents of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska combined, turned in 31,872 pounds (16 tons) of unwanted or expired medications for safe and proper disposal at the 168 take-back sites.

"In a time when opioid abuse has increased so dramatically nationwide, our communities of the Northwest really rose to the challenge by safely removing significant amounts of unused pharmaceutical drugs from unintended circulation," said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis.

When the results of the 11 DEA Take Back Days for the PNW are combined, the DEA and its state, local, and tribal law-enforcement and community partners have removed over 300,328 pounds (150.2 tons) of medication from circulation.

The following are the results broken down by state:

Washington -- 13,800 pounds (6.9 tons) removed from circulation.
Idaho -- 3,068 pounds (1.5 tons) removed from circulation.
Oregon -- 10,842 pounds (5.4 tons) removed from circulation.
Alaska -- 4162 pounds (2.1 tons) removed from circulation.

Nationwide, DEA and over 4,200 of its state, local, and tribal law enforcement partners collected 893,498 pounds of unwanted medicines--about 447 tons--at almost 5,400 sites spread through all 50 states, beating its previous high of 390 tons in the spring of 2014 by 57 tons, or more than 114,000 pounds.

The majority of prescription drug abusers report in surveys that they get their drugs from friends and family. Americans understand that cleaning out old prescription drugs from medicine cabinets, kitchen drawers, and bedside tables reduces accidents, thefts, and the misuse and abuse of these medicines, including the opioid painkillers that accounted for 20,808 drug overdoses--78 a day--in 2014 (the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Eight out of 10 new heroin users began by abusing prescription painkillers and moved to heroin when they could no longer obtain or afford those painkillers.

The public can submit tips anonymously, via a DEA text tip line. Utilizing a mobile device, send a text to "TIP411" and start your message with "TIPDEA."
Thu. 05/05/16
Sumner Band Parents Association is hosting a clothing drive to raise money for expenses for the High School Band.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/05/16 12:00 PM
Sumner, WA -- Sumner Band Parents Association partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for The Sumner High School Band.

The Sumner Band Parents Association supports the Sumner High School Band, its Director, and Students physically, emotionally, and financially.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: Sumner High School, located at 1707 W Main Street. They will be collecting donations between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on May 14th.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Cindy Spencer at 425-922-2493, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
The Swaziland Missions Trip from COTR is hosting a clothing drive
Clothes for the Cause - 05/05/16 10:30 AM
Snoqualmie, WA -- The Swaziland Missions Trip from COTR partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for the Swaziland Missions Trip.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: The YMCA Parking Lot located at 35018 SE Ridge St, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. They will be collecting donations Saturday, May 14th from 11am -- 7pm and Sunday, May 15th from 11am -- 5pm.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Laura Lamborn at 425-283-3880 Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Tahoma Lacrosse Club is hosting a clothing drive to raise money
Clothes for the Cause - 05/05/16 9:00 AM
Maple Valley, WA -- Greenlake Crew partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for the team.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at: 26216 SE 230th Street, Maple Valley, WA 98038. They will be collecting on May 14th at 10am.


For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Laura Lamborn at 425-283-3880 Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Wed. 05/04/16
Road Map Region Race to the Top Executive Committee Issues Preliminary Awards of $443,491 for final Round of Teaching and Leading Investment Fund
Puget Sound ESD - 05/04/16 3:23 PM
The Executive Committee for the Road Map Region Race to the Top grant issued preliminary awards of $443,491 in Investment Funds for Teaching and Leading as part of the third and final round of awards to districts participating in the consortium.

The consortium's Race to the Top grant includes 12 funded projects spanning from "cradle to career." Four of the 12 projects were specified in the grant as Investment Funds, whereby districts apply through a process to use the funds in ways that advance student achievement and help the Road Map Project reach its goal of doubling the number of students prepared to graduate from college or earn a career credential. These four projects, Teaching and Leading, PreK-3rd Grade Systems, College & Career Readiness and Community-School Partnerships, represent nearly half of the consortium's total grant, $18 million out of $40 million.

A total of $7.3 million will be awarded for Teaching and Leading in three disbursements. The first distribution of these funds totaled $2.2 million and the second distribution totaled $2.9 million. Round 3.1 funds totaled $1.6 million and Round 3.2 (final round) totaled $443,491. Round 3.2 included these preliminary awards:

Federal Way School District: Math Leadership K-8/Algebra and Project-Based Learning/Ambitious Science Teaching Instruction, $283,241
Renton School District: Renton Leadership/Teacher Professional Learning in Mathematics, $160,250


Teaching and Leading is the largest single project in the Consortium's Race to the Top grant. It focuses on building teacher and principal content knowledge to assist in the creation of personalized learning environments in the region's high-need schools. The emphasis of this fund is on scalable high impact improvements in math, science and English Language Learner (ELL) instruction as well as teacher and principal leadership. A big emphasis this round is to develop and implement sustainability plans to ensure that promising practices continue beyond the life of the grant.

"I am impressed by the passion and commitment behind both proposals to build the capacity of both teachers and principals," said Project Manager, Carla Jackson. "It is exciting to see that several districts are implementing complimentary math and/or science practices in a way that they can learn from one another. The synergy that can be built through cross-district conversations and visitations can only strengthen everyone's practice and ultimately benefit our most important resource -- our students."

An independent panel was assembled to score the proposals and make recommendations to the Executive Committee. Award recommendations were made based on points received as well as other factors that impact the region such as return on investment and scalability. Following preliminary award decisions, PSESD will finalize the terms of each award with districts through a contracting process.



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About the Road Map Region Race to the Top Grant
The Auburn, Federal Way, Highline, Kent, Renton, Seattle and Tukwila school districts competed together for $40 million in Race to the Top federal funding as the Road Map District Consortium. The districts' grant was among 16 winners picked from nearly 400 applications by the U.S. Department of Education. The Puget Sound Educational Service District (PSESD) is responsible for managing the grant's implementation and functions as the fiscal agent. For more information visit www.roadmapracetothetop.org
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/04/16 2:05 PM
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94149/thumb_BPA-Deputy-Administrator-Dan-James.jpg
Portland, Ore. - BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer announced today the appointment of Dan James, formerly of the regional utility cooperative PNGC Power, to the position of deputy administrator for the Northwest power marketing agency.

"Dan is a terrific addition to the leadership team at Bonneville -- his character and experience get right at the heart of what we are about: focusing on safety and staying connected to the region through customers, tribes, constituents and others," said Mainzer. "Dan's positive demeanor is infectious, and he's dedicated to operational excellence and achieving tangible results."

As deputy administrator, James will be responsible for leadership, strategic planning, financial management, and regulatory affairs as well as intergovernmental and public affairs oversight. He will oversee and provide direction and guidance for program execution and administration to executive vice presidents, vice presidents and managers of Corporate Strategy, Finance, Communications, Intergovernmental Affairs, the Ombudsman, and Compliance, Audit and Risk.

"I am delighted to have Dan's long-time expertise in the energy field joining Bonneville," said U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon. "His relationship with the congressional delegation spans decades, and he brings an important knowledge of the Northwest's energy needs."

James comes to BPA from PNGC Power, where he has served as vice president of public affairs and marketing since 2007.

Prior to his PNGC experience, James worked as a federal affairs representative at Pacific Northwest Waterways Association in Vancouver, Wash., and as a senior government relations specialist at Ball Janik LLP in Portland and Washington, D.C.

"Dan is a great choice for the deputy position," said Scott Corwin, executive director of the Public Power Council, which represents the interests of publicly owned utilities in the Northwest. "Having worked in various sectors involving the river system, he is one of the foremost experts on issues impacting BPA and the Columbia Basin. Dan has a sterling reputation for integrity and sincere collaboration and will be a great asset to Bonneville and to the citizens of the region in this role."

"Dan understands the unique role that BPA plays in the lives of the people it serves, and the opportunities and challenges facing the agency," said Beth Looney, president and CEO of PNGC Power. "I look forward to working with him in the years ahead."

James is also a member of the National Preference Customer Committee of the National Electric Cooperative Association and is a senior fellow of the Oregon chapter of the American Leadership Forum.

"The region is very lucky to have Dan named deputy administrator at BPA. His broad knowledge base and vast experience, both in the region and in Washington, D.C., will benefit all customers of BPA," said Mark Johnson, general manager of Flathead Electric Cooperative of Kalispell, Mont., and chairman of the executive committee for the Public Power Council. "As a Montanan, it is always nice to see another Montanan, especially one from the Flathead Valley, achieve such an important and influential position. All of us in public power will miss Dan in his current role, but we know he will represent us well, and I look forward to working with him as the deputy administrator."

James grew up in western Montana near Flathead Lake. He earned a bachelor's degree in political science at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Ore., in 1987 and remains a faithful follower of the university's football team to this day. He also earned a utility management certificate from Willamette University in Portland in 2015. He has served on boards for such community organizations as United Way of Columbia-Willamette, Pacific University, Oregon Wave Energy Trust and the Pacific Youth Choir. He lives in Northeast Portland with his spouse and two teenage daughters.

"I have been fortunate to live in the Northwest most of my life and work for the people of our rural areas most of my career," said James. "I am excited to join Elliot's team at a time when the agency faces unique opportunities and challenges."

James is scheduled to start in the deputy administrator position within the next several weeks.


Attached Media Files: Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
Geneva Elementary PTA is hosting a clothing drive
Clothes for the Cause - 05/04/16 10:37 AM
Bellingham, WA -- Geneva Elementary PTA partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for the school.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can make arrangements for drop off or pick up of your items to this clothing drive at: Michelle palecale@aol.com or the school located at 1401 Geneva St, Bellingham, WA 98229 Phone: (360) 676-6416They will be collecting donations between NOW and May 18th 2016.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Susan Hovey at
206 455 4573 email: susan@clothesforthecausefundraising.com, Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Mountain View Community Church is hosting a clothing drive to raise money for events throughout the year. (Photo)
Clothes for the Cause - 05/04/16 9:23 AM
Mountain View Community Church Host Clothing Drive Fundraiser
Mountain View Community Church Host Clothing Drive Fundraiser
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5196/94120/thumb_Clothing_Drive_Header.png
Everett, WA - Mountain View Community Church is Hosting a Clothing and Textile Drive!
Collecting Now- May 10th, 2016

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

PRE COLLECTION IS KEY TO OUR FUNDRAISER!!
We can arrange pick up or drop off for you.
Please clean out your closets and help support Mountain View Community Church!

Accepted Items: CLOTHING gently used; PAIRED SHOES any kind/gently used; TOWELS bath, kitchen, SHEETS, BLANKETS, QUILTS; BACKPACKS; CURTAINS/DRAPERY; PURSES, BELTS synthetic/leather; TABLECLOTHS, PLACEMATS, STUFFED ANIMALS ....

We cannot take glass, breakables, electronics, pet beds, bed pillows, carpeting, uniforms, or hotel/hospital linens, or items previously for sale at a thrift store.
Please place your items in TIED garbage bags. No boxes or bins please.

Contact with Questions:
Beth Hutchings
bethhutchings@comcast.net
425-337-3706

If you are interested in hosting an event for your team, group or club or would like more information please contact :
Susan Hovey @ 206 455 4573 / susan@clothesforthecausefundraising.com
OR Liz Gordon @ 425 239 6478 / lizgordon@msn.com


Attached Media Files: Mountain View Community Church Host Clothing Drive Fundraiser
Cedar Heights Middle School is hosting a clothing drive to raise money for the PTA
Clothes for the Cause - 05/04/16 9:18 AM
There was a misprint in the original press release. This event is in conjunction with Cedar Heights PTA and not Mountain View Community Church. They are also hosting a clothing drive now through next week on Tuesday May 10. Here is some additional information about their event however I'm pretty certain it is out of your area of impact but I wanted to get a clarification to you asap!

Thanks,

Monica

Mountain View Community Church is Hosting a Clothing and Textile Drive!
Collecting Now- May 10th, 2016

PRE COLLECTION IS KEY TO OUR FUNDRAISER!!
We can arrange pick up or drop off for you.
Please clean out your closets and help support Mountain View Community Church!

Accepted Items: CLOTHING gently used; PAIRED SHOES any kind/gently used; TOWELS bath, kitchen, SHEETS, BLANKETS, QUILTS; BACKPACKS; CURTAINS/DRAPERY; PURSES, BELTS synthetic/leather; TABLECLOTHS, PLACEMATS, STUFFED ANIMALS ....

We cannot take glass, breakables, electronics, pet beds, bed pillows, carpeting, uniforms, or hotel/hospital linens, or items previously for sale at a thrift store.
Please place your items in TIED garbage bags. No boxes or bins please.

Contact with Questions:
Beth Hutchings
bethhutchings@comcast.net
425-337-3706

If you are interested in hosting an event for your team, group or club or would like more information please contact :
Susan Hovey @ 206 455 4573 / susan@clothesforthecausefundraising.com
OR Liz Gordon @ 425 239 6478 / lizgordon@msn.com

Kent, WA -- Cedar Heights Middle School partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for their PTA.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can drop off your donations to this clothing drive at:
Cedar Heights Middle School located at 19640 SE 272nd St, Kent, WA 98042. They will be collecting donations between May 9th and 13th..

For more information, contact your local Event Planner, Laura Lamborn at 425-283-3880 Facebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Arlington HS Class of 2016 Grad Night is hosting a clothing drive to raise money for a safe and sober grad night.
Clothes for the Cause - 05/04/16 9:10 AM
Arlington, WA -- Arlington HS Class of 2016 Grad Night partners with Clothes for the Cause, a fundraising company that collects clothes in exchange for cash, for an event to raise money for a safe and sober grad night.

Clothes for the Cause makes it easy for everyone in our community to contribute by not asking for money or for someone to buy something. Instead they partner with fundraising groups to collect items that our friends, family and neighbors already have in their houses such as clothes, shoes, purses, belts and household linens.

You can arrange drop off or pick up of your donations with:
Diona Ries at atowneaglemom@yahoo.com or 425 737 7730 They will be collecting donations NOW through May 7th 2016.

For more information, contact your local Event Planner,
Susan Hovey at 206 455 4573 or susan@clothesforthecausefundraising.comFacebook at Clothes for the Cause, Twitter @Clothes4_Cause, Instagram Clothes4_Cause or online at www.clothesforthecausefundraising.com.
Mon. 05/02/16
BLM Extends Deadline for Nominations for Reclamation and Sustainable Mineral Development Awards
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/02/16 12:02 PM
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has extended to May 31, 2016 the deadline for submitting nominations for the 2016 Reclamation and Sustainable Mineral Development Awards. The prior deadline was April 12.

These non-monetary awards highlight some of the finest examples of responsible mineral resource development and illustrate the principles of sustainable development without compromising the needs of future generations. The awards program also helps to promote successful ideas and practices that may be implemented at various locations throughout the nation.

"These awards honor achievements in environmental health, social responsibility, and economic security," said Michael Nedd, BLM Assistant Director for Energy, Minerals and Realty Management. "They also highlight mineral development that protects and restores the environment while meeting modern needs for these raw materials."
The awards fall under five categories: the Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award, the Hardrock Mineral Community Outreach and Economic Security Award, the Hardrock Mineral Small Operator Award, the Hardrock Mineral Directors Award, and the "Fix A Shaft Today!" Award.
The Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award recognizes efforts in environmental stewardship. This category recognizes achievements demonstrating continuous or repeated efforts to successfully meet or exceed Federal, State, or local reclamation requirements with minimal oversight.
The Hardrock Mineral Community Outreach and Economic Security Award recognizes projects that show concern for community responsibilities and the economic benefits of mineral development. This award recognizes successful coordination of projects with local and regional stakeholders. Projects that contribute to quality of life or show concern for a community's long-term health are also eligible.

The Hardrock Mineral Small Operator Award recognizes efforts in environmental stewardship of operators with fewer than 15 employees. Similar to the Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award, this award recognizes achievements demonstrating continuous or repeated efforts to successfully meet or exceed Federal, State, or local reclamation requirements with minimal oversight.
The Hardrock Mineral Director's Award recognizes outstanding achievement in a particular area of sustainable development. The award will recognize an operator whose dedication and commitment to excellence has resulted in the use of a new or innovative design or technique that allows or enhances successful operations in technically challenging conditions or in critical environmental settings.
The Fix A Shaft Today!"("FAST!") Award recognizes active participation in the FAST! Campaign, which is a partnership initiative aimed at eradicating unsafe abandoned mine land features, especially open mine shafts.
Nominations are to be submitted to the BLM State Office (Attention: Solid Minerals) that has jurisdiction in the State where the operation is located. It is anticipated that the presentation of the awards will take place in Las Vegas in the fall of 2016 in conjunction with MINExpo.

Mining companies, regulatory authorities, geologists, and members of the public may nominate operators or organizations in the non-coal solid minerals industries for an award. Nominations need not be limited to operations on land managed by the BLM. For detailed information on the nomination and selection processes, including the required format for nominations CLICK HERE: http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/wo/Communications_Directorate/public_affairs/news_release_attachments.Par.92208.File.dat/2016%20Sustain%20Final.pdf